ROMAY DAVIS, 102-YEAR-OLD BLACK FEMALE ARMY VET HONORED WITH GOLD MEDAL

Romay Davis is the oldest of six survivors of the first all-female, all-women-of-color unit to serve in the U.S. Army years before the 1948 integration of the military Maxwell AFB, Ala. – Congressional Gold Medal recipient Private Romay Catherine Johnson Davis at Montgomery City Hall, Jul. 26, 2022.

President Joe Biden approved the Congressional Gold Medal presentation to the women of the 6888 th Central Postal Directory Battalion, an all-female, all-African American unit that resolved a backlog of more than 17 million pieces of mail during World War II.

Maxwell AFB, Ala. – Congressional Gold Medal recipient Private Romay Catherine Johnson Davis at Montgomery City Hall, Jul. 26, 2022.

President Joe Biden approved the Congressional Gold Medal presentation to the women of the 6888 th Central Postal Directory Battalion, an all-female, all-African American unit that resolved a backlog of more than 17 million pieces of mail during World War II.

She found it while making history in the first all-female, all-women-of-color unit to serve in the U.S. Army in World War II.

Now, at age 102, as the oldest of six survivors of the groundbreaking 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion, she’s a new recipient of the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest honor Congress can bestow.

Among those brothers who enlisted ahead of her, Davis says two of them went into the Marines, one became a sailor, one worked as an aircraft airman and one was stationed in Hawaii with the U.S.O. “But I said, ‘They could make it,’ because they were younger and healthy and active, and I was also, and I wanted to be free to take the chance, to get the experience of being in a group and away from home.”

After serving “two years, four months and three days, I think,” Davis followed her time in the Women’s Army Corps by relocating from her parents’ home in King George County, Virginia, to New York City.

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