BIG PAPI A BIG HIT AT HALL OF FAME INDUCTION

His megawatt smile tinged with a tad of emotion, the former Boston Red Sox slugger was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame on Sunday — after his daughter Alexandra sang the national anthiem — and was humbled by his surroundings.

“I always tried to live my life in a way … so I can make a positive influence in the world,” said the 46-year-old Ortiz, just the 58th player elected in his first year on the ballot.

Ortiz, who survived a nightclub shooting in the Dominican Republic three years ago, soaked in the celebration.

Six Era Committee selections also comprised in the Class of 2022 — former Twins teammates Jim Kaat and Tony Oliva, the late Minnie Miñoso, former Dodgers star and Mets manager Gil Hodges, and Black pioneers Buck O’Neil and Bud Fowler.

I n 14 years with the Red Sox, Ortiz hit 500 homers — 17 of them in the postseason.

That was far from the mind on this day as Ortiz paid tribute to many in both English and Spanish.

Oliva was the American League Rookie of the Year in 1964, led the league in hits five times, and became the first player in major league history to win batting titles in each of his first two seasons, finishing with a lifetime average of .304 in 15 seasons with the Twins.

Miñoso grew up on a sugar plantation and played ball on weekends as a kid and became a star with the New York Cubans in the Negro Leagues before becoming the first Black Latino player in the major leagues in 1949, two years after Jackie Robinson broke in.

To Cuban players, Miñoso was the Jackie Robinson of Latino America and starred for the White Sox in the 1950s.

Irene Hodges spoke on behalf of her father, a hard-hitting first baseman who had 370 homers and 1,274 RBIs in 18 major league seasons — all but the last two with the Dodgers.

“He would remind all of us that his playing careeer was in the Negro Leagues and today he was being inducted into the same class as a Black baseball pioneer, Bud Fowler, and a former Negro League All-Star, Minnie Miñoso,” Terry said.

Hall of Famer Dave Winfield paid tribute to Fowler, the first Black to play on a white professional team nearly seven decades before Robinson broke the color barrier with the Dodgers.

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