BLACK WOMEN DEFY THE ODDS OF FARM OWNERSHIP

Stanley has been growing flowers, herbs, teas and other medicinal plants all with the goal of healing, on her own farm in Liberty, North Carolina, since 2018.

“Because of the trauma that’s been inflicted on the Black community, Indigenous community, when it comes to land, a lot of us have lost that connection, and we don’t look to the land for some of the reinforcements that we need for our well-being,” Stanley said.

In building her very own farm, she received a crash course in the many roadblocks that Black farmers face.

Stanley is part of the less than 1% of Black rural landowners in this country.

These statistics have motivated her to bring other Black women into agriculture to find their own source of healing and freedom.

“I also don’t even pretend to be able to offer a solution to a problem that the ones who are responsible for carrying forth the tradition of this problem aren’t addressing,” Stanley added, “For me, it’s more about how do we create as much Black joy as possible?

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