REPUBLICANS FLEE FROM TRUMP

President Donald Trump’s steadfast grip on Republicans in Washington is beginning to crumble, leaving him more politically isolated than at any other point in his turbulent administration.

The insurrection on the heels of a bruising election loss in Georgia accomplished what other low points in Trump’s presidency did not: force Republicans to fundamentally reassess their relationship with a leader who has long abandoned tradition and decorum.

When the week began, Trump was without question the most dominant political force in Republican politics and a 2024 kingmaker, if not the GOP’s next presidential nominee himself.

Trump still has supporters, especially among the many rank-and-file Republican voters and conservative activists beyond Washington.

Trump has no plans to disappear from the political debate once he leaves office, according to aides who believe he remains wildly popular among the Republican rank-and-file.

Lest there be any doubt, Trump’s false claims about voter fraud in his November loss resonated with hundreds of thousands of Republican voters in Georgia’s Senate runoff elections this week.

Leading Republican pollster Frank Luntz has had extensive conversations with grassroots voters and Republican officials about Trump’s standing since the siege.

On Thursday, Cotton chastised Republican colleagues like Hawley and Cruz, who had given voters “false hope” that Trump’s November loss could be overturned.

AP

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